Select Committee on Euthanasia

The Rights of the Terminally Ill Act has been made ineffective by an amendment made to the Northern Territory (Self-Government) Act 1978 of the Commonwealth.

Rights of the Terminally Ill Act 1995
The Rights of the Terminally Ill Bill was passed by the Northern Territory’s Legislative Assembly on 25 May 1995.

On 16 June 1995, His Honour the Administrator of the Northern Territory of Australia, Mr KJ (Austin) Asche, advised the Legislative Assembly that, pursuant to section 7 of the Northern Territory (Self-Government) Act 1978 of the Commonwealth, he had assented to the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act 1995 to become proposed law. The Act came into operation on 1 July 1996.

The Northern Territory Government has made available the following documents published by the Legislative Assembly:

  • Speech made by Mr Marshall Perron, MLA Member for Fannie Bay, when the Bill was first introduced on 22 February, 1995. 

  • The Rights of the Terminally Ill Bill, Serial 67, as originally introduced to the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly on 22 February 1995. 

  • The Rights of the Terminally Ill Act 1995. 

  • Extracts from the Parliamentary Record of the Debates of the Legislative Assembly on the Rights of the Terminally Ill Bill 1995 held on 24 and 25 May 1995 a.m.

Rights of the Terminally Ill Amendment Act 1996
The Rights of the Terminally Ill Amendment Bill was passed by the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly on 20 February 1996 and assented to by His Honour the Administrator of the Northern Territory of Australia, Mr KJ (Austin) Asche, on 20 March 1996. This Act came into effect on 1 July 1996.

  • Extracts from the Parliamentary Record of the Debates of the Legislative Assembly on the Respect for Human Life Bill and the Rights of the Terminally Ill Amendment Act on Tuesday February 20 1996. 

  • Rights to the Terminally Ill Amendment Act 1996 

  • Draft Consolidation of the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act 1995 as amended. (amendments highlighted) 

  • Rights of the Terminally Ill Act

Regulations
On 5 June 1996, The Hon. Fred Finch, MLA issued a media release  announcing that the Draft Regulations for the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act were to be released to Parliamentarians and interested groups for comment.

  • Draft regulations, Rights of the Terminally Ill Act 
  • Regulations under the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act (28 June 1996

Private Member’s Bill introduced by Mr Neil Bell, MLA Member for Macdonnell

  • Respect for Human Life Bill 1996 (defeated) 
  • Second reading speech made by Mr Neil Bell, MLA Member for Macdonnell¬† on 15 March 1996

Private Member’s Bill introduced by Mr Neil Bell, MLA, Member for Macdonnell

  • Care of the Dying Consultation Bill 1996 (defeated) 
  • Second reading speech made by Mr Neil Bell MLA, Member for Macdonnell¬†on 15 March 1996

Private Member’s Bill introduced by Mr Eric Poole, MLA, Member for Araluen

  • Rights of the Terminally Ill Amendment Bill 1996 (defeated)

Senate Legal & Constitutional Legal Committee, March 1997
In June 1996, Mr Kevin Andrews, Member for Menzies in the Commonwealth House of Representatives announced his intention to introduce a private member’s Bill to override the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act. On 9 September 1996, he introduced the Bill entitled Euthanasia Laws Bill 1996 in the House. On 9 December 1996, the House of Representatives agreed to the bill with amendments.

On 7 November 1996, while debate on the Bill continued in the House of Representatives, the Senate Selection of Bills Committee recommended and the Senate agreed that the provisions of the Bill be referred to the Senate Legal and Constitutional Legislation Committee for inquiry. The report was tabled in the House in March 1997.

  • Report of the Senate Legal & Constitutional Legal Committee, March 1997

The Copyright Act 1968 permits certain reproduction and publication of this proposed law. In particular, section 182A of the Act enables a complete copy to be made by or on behalf of a person for a particular person. For reproduction or publication beyond that permitted by the Act, prior written permission must be sought from:

The Best Way Of Enriching Knowledge In Aboriginal Lifestyle Culture

The people of Australia have immense pride in their ancient culture and rich traditions. In recent times, the government has created awareness with Aboriginal people and they have started to learn about the ancient cultures of the ancestors. People were following the traditions and cultures for many thousand years and the traditions are slowly vanishing now. However, the government is implementing various programs, for protecting the aboriginal culture. The cultural heritage management plan is an effective way of safeguarding the ancient cultures and people are cooperating with the government in implementing its plans.

Aboriginal Lifestyle Culture

Real Purpose Of The Management Plan On Culture And Traditions:

The high impact activities and large developments may harm the aboriginal culture, if they are implemented in the sensitive landscapes. Right now, registered aboriginal parties are there in Australia and are they are involving with the development projects. The heritage management plan is the written permission to carry on effective developing projects. In fact, because of the arrival of the modern technologies and developments, the aboriginal culture and heritage should not be affected, at any cost. There are professional heritage cultural advisors, who need to prepare the projects. These professionals know how to avoid damage to the aboriginal traditions and culture. All measures have to be taken, before starting a new project and after the project, so that the project does not affect the ancient aboriginal culture. The cultural heritage management professionals have a very deep knowledge in the aboriginal cultures and they take care of the ancient culture of Australia.

Followers Of The Aboriginal Culture And Practices:

Today, the archeologists have found many facts of the ancient culture and practices and they are trying to compare with the modern practices.

Aboriginal Culture And Practices

  • The Australian citizens of these days have gained knowledge about the ancient aboriginal people and they want to do research on aboriginal archeology.
  • In fact, many professional historians and archeologists have given vital information about the practices of the aboriginal people.
  • Whatever they did, there were valuable reasons for their activities. Even in those days, people had belief on several aboriginal objects.
  • The Australian government is shouldering the responsibility of managing and protecting aboriginal traditions through various cultural and heritage sites.

Many of the practices of the aboriginal people may look funny for the people in these days and at the same time, all the practices of the aboriginal people, have meaning and depth.